Dr. Katie Stabb

New 24/7 Mental Health support launched for GPRC students

Dr. Katie Stabb
Dr. Katie Stabb shows the new MySSP App that provides GPRC students 24/7 access to mental health supports

GPRC knows college can be a time of change, adjustment, and stress for students and we are here to offer help! GPRC has partnered with Morneau Shepell to bring its students the new Student Support Program (My SSP)! This exciting new program will serve as a support while juggling studies and personal life demands.

“My SSP is an important addition to GPRC’s student mental health supports. The various format options, the 24/7 availability, and the ability to tailor to individual needs is what makes this program special. Students can access professional support at a time, and in a format that works for them. I’m confident that use of this program will help build resiliency and wellness in our student body and college community,” said Dr. Katie Stabb, Registered Psychologist at GPRC.

My SSP is free to use and personal information is kept private. Students have unlimited access to articles, tools, resources, and dedicated My SSP Advisors/Counsellors that can help them succeed during their studies. All My SSP Advisors/Counsellors have a minimum of a Master’s degree in a counselling field, and are licenced to practice counselling.

My SSP Advisors/Counsellors can help with:

  • Adapting to college life
  • Frustration, concern, or uncertainty about any aspect of your life
  • Worries about upcoming exams or disappointment with academic performance
  • Stress related to procrastination and time management
  • Maintaining balance between home, work, and school
  • Being successful at school and post-graduation
  • Relationships with friends and family
  • Stress related to finances and juggling multiple responsibilities
  • Being mentally healthy and much more!

Students may call or chat with My SSP Advisor/Counsellor at any time (24/7) to receive immediate support or to schedule an appointment.

There are many ways to access 24/7 support:

  • Download the free ‘My SSP’ app from your device’s app store (available on Apple and Android devices) to call or chat with a My SSP Advisor/Counsellor
  • Visit the website mystudentsupport.com to access articles, tools, and resources to help you succeed
  • Dial 855.649.8641 to speak to a My SSP Advisor/Counsellor over the phone, 24/7!

This program is confidential within the limits of the law.  No one will know you have reached out unless you choose to tell them.

Stay tuned for more information about the My SSP and reach out to Dr. Katie Stabb in Student Services (H103) if you have any questions or visit gprc.me/mentalhealth to learn more about the on-campus and community supports for students.

GPRC volunteers care for evacuees’ furry family members

Some of the GPRC faculty and staff who helped look after the evacuated animals Tiffany Duncan, Katey Johnston, Lin Roy, Bonnie Danielson, Dr. Chris Mizzi, Lisa Coady, Carl Ball, Rhonda Shaw, and Shannon Ball.

GPRC’s Fairview campus became home for some important members of families evacuated from northwestern Alberta due to wildfires.

First year Animal Health Technology student Dayna McKay who is living on campus during the summer is lending a hand.

The College’s Animal Health Technology program put out the call offering to house any animals for displaced families shortly after the mandatory evacuations started in northwestern Alberta. A few days later, when the Town of Manning was placed under evacuation notice, the local veterinary clinic reached out to ask GPRC to look after the animals it had been housing for evacuees.

“We wanted to make sure the animals were safe somewhere else,” said Kaitie Koch, manager of the Manning Veterinary Clinic.

Shaylene Syrota, RVT, Educational Lab Technologist AHT – Animal Sciences Department and Dr. Christy Barlund, DVM – Instructor – Animal Sciences Department were two of the faculty and staff volunteers.

The clinic had already housed animals from families evacuated from High Level for about 10 days.

When the animals arrived on campus, GPRC’s animal health faculty and staff did an amazing job, said Koch.

“They were incredibly helpful and knew what exactly needed to be done,” she said.

Over the course of the evacuation notice, GPRC housed a total of 11 dogs, one cat and one hamster. The program faculty and staff continued any treatments the animals needed and monitored them daily to ensure they were doing well, explained Rhonda Shaw, Animal Health Technology instructor.

The animals were weighed in and weighed out, had their appetite and attitude monitored daily, and were fed and walked twice a day. The dogs all got time to run in the College’s round pen.

Volunteers would send videos and pictures of the animals to their owners so the owners knew their pets were doing OK. Volunteers hoped the photos would help reduce some of the stress the evacuees were experiencing.

“We were grateful to be able to provide some comfort by having the evacuees know their animals were safe and well cared for,” said Shaw.

Lin Roy, Program Assistant – Animal Sciences Department and Rhonda Shaw, RVT, Instructor – Animal Sciences Department with the first evacuee heading home.

Jill Gaudet’s dog Spike was one of the animals that were cared for by GPRC staff on the Fairview campus.

“I have to thank Manning Veterinary for ensuring Spike was safe by taking him to Fairview,” said Gaudet. “And thanks to GPRC for taking care of Spike. During a very stressful time, it is a relief to know your pet is safe and well-cared for.”

Marcella Parenteau was also evacuated from Paddle Prairie Métis Settlement and her dog Lolly was at GPRC Fairview.

“I’m so grateful,” said Parenteau. “Being evacuated was very stressful and scary, and having Lolly looked after in Manning and then in Fairview was a relief for me. Thank you for watching her for me.”

Volunteer students, faculty and staff at the Fairview campus provided all this help. They even had a waitlist of people wanting to volunteer.

Cathy Srayko, Toolroom attendant motorcycle certificate program donated five bags of dog food to send home with evacuees when they pick their pets up.

“Staff have been amazing. We had an abundance of people helping,” said Shaw.

All the volunteers received a mini-training session before they had contact with animals.

“You were there for us in our time of need,” said Koch. “We really, really appreciated it. We know how much work it is to look after that number of animals. It took a huge stress and worry off our plate.”

Thank you to all the volunteers who helped feed, water, walk and play with the animals in our care:

  • Lin Roy, Program Assistant – Animal Sciences Department
  • Lisa Coady, Program Assistant – Motorcycle & Recreational Powersports Department
  • Katey Johnston, RVT, Educational Lab Technologist AHT – Animal Sciences Department
  • Shaylene Syrota, RVT, Educational Lab Technologist AHT – Animal Sciences Department
  • Rhonda Shaw, RVT, Instructor – Animal Sciences Department
  • Shannon Ball, Toolroom Attendant – Automotive, Parts, & Engineering Department
  • Carl Ball – Instructor – Motorcycle & Recreational Powersports Department
  • Tiffany Duncan, RVT, Instructor – Animal Sciences Department
  • Bonnie Danielson, RVT, Instructor – Animal Sciences Department
  • Chris Mizzi, DVM, Instructor – Animal Sciences Department
  • Christy Barlund, DVM – Instructor – Animal Sciences Department
  • Dayna McKay, first year AHT student
  • Taryn Dodds, first year AHT student

 

GPRC Animal Health Technology Staff make sure the animals the college housed on the Fairview campus get to spend plenty of time outside.
GPRC Wolves: New Recruit to the Women’s Volleyball Team

GPRC Wolves: New Recruit to the Women’s Volleyball Team

GPRC Wolves Women’s Volleyball Head Coach, Chantelle LaMotte has been working hard to build onto her talented roster for this upcoming season. She is pleased to announce the signing of Beaumont recruit, Hayley Hall to the program.

GPRC Wolves Women’s Volleyball new recruit, Hayley Hall. Hayley is committing to the Wolves for the 2019-20 season.

Joining the squad from Beaumont, Alberta, Hayley Hall is bringing a ton of experience to the upcoming 2019-2020 season.

Bringing home a bronze medal at provincials with her team the Ponoka Warriors in 2017 and most recently, brought home a bronze medal at the Premier 3 tournament with her team, the Edmonton Nooks in 2019. Hayley digs deep and is a teammate who is always encouraging others on the court.

Getting ready to start her Bachelor of Social Work degree at GPRC, Hayley says she is most excited “to see what college volleyball looks like.” She is looking forward to continuing to improve her skills and work hard to gain more of a skill set under the direction of great coaching and mentorship under seasoned athletes.

“I was given an awesome opportunity to play volleyball at a collegiate level for a team that I am excited to learn from and grow with,” says Hayley when asked why she decided to continue her academic and athletic career at GPRC.

Head Coach Chantelle LaMotte is looking forward to having Hayley added to the roster this upcoming season.

“We are very excited to have Hayley on board. She is a physical, dynamic player with tremendous potential.”

Welcome to the pack, Hayley.

_______________________________________________________

Women’s Volleyball Head Coach, Chantelle LaMotte  is pleased to announce the signing of two new recruits to the program.  

Say hello to Halle Krall and Kari White as we welcome them to the pack.

GPRC Wolves Women’s Volleyball new recruit, Halle Krall. Halle is committing to the Wolves for the 2019-20 season.

Joining the squad on the court this season is Halle Krall. Hailing from Peace River, Alberta, Halle is looking forward to repping the Wolves colours as she completes her Bachelor of Education – Elementary degree.

Halle is bringing some great experience to the squad after she secured a spot on the GPRC Wolves All-Star Volleyball team roster in 2017 and 2018. She also brought home Bronze this past season at Provincials.

Halle is excited to start this next chapter of her academic and athletic career.

“I chose GPRC because it’s close to home and has great academic programs with a smaller campus feel,” she said. “It also has great sport supports in place. I’m most excited to play with a new group of girls that have a lot of experience while I’m learning new skills.”

Head Coach Chantelle LaMotte is looking forward to welcoming Halle to the pack.

“Halle is going to bring some excellent skill to our roster this season,” said LaMotte. “The entire squad is looking forward to welcoming her.”

Welcome to the pack, Halle.

GPRC Wolves Women’s Volleyball new recruit, Kari White. Kari is committing to the Wolves for the 2019-20 season.

Local recruit, Kari White is joining the pack this upcoming volleyball season. Hailing from Grande Prairie, Alberta, Kari is bringing a ton of great experience to the squad. Bringing home the Provincial title in 2017 and a bronze Provincial medal in 2018. Kari also was named the 2018 All-Star at the Louis St. Laurent Tournament and brought home a bronze medal at her 2019 Premier 3.

Kari is excited to be joining the Wolves and start her Bachelor of Science degree at GPRC.

“I grew up watching Wolves volleyball games and the culture GPRC has is something that has always inspired me,” said Kari when asked why she chose GPRC. “Grande Prairie is a volleyball community and gives you a sense of belonging and togetherness as a player and a team.”

Kari is most excited about “being challenged by my talented teammates and the competition at the ACAC level.” She is looking forward to continuing to work hard and grow her potential.

Head Coach Chantelle LaMotte is very pleased to be adding a talented local athlete to the Wolves roster.

“It’s also fantastic to be able to recruit local talented athletes. We are looking forward to welcoming Kari to the squad and getting to grow together as a team.”

Welcome to the pack, Kari.

_______________________________________________________

GPRC Wolves Women’s Volleyball welcomes to new recruits on March 26.

Say hello to Lana Matthews and Heather Holtz as we welcome them to the pack.

GPRC Wolves Women’s Volleyball new recruit, Lana Matthews. Lana is committing to the Wolves for the 2019-20 season.

Hailing from Villeneuve, Alberta, Lana is bringing a ton of great experience to the Wolves this upcoming season. She has experience playing in the 2016 Alberta Winter Games, Beach Volleyball leagues in YEG and won gold at the AVA Premier 2 in 2018. Lana also won gold with her team in her last year of high school at Morinville Community High School.

Lana is excited to join the wolf pack and start her post-secondary journey at GPRC.

“I chose GPRC because of the great sports community with excellent sport and academic supports,” she says. “Plus it’s cool that my high school team was also the Wolves, so it’s great to continue with the name. “Once a wolf, always a wolf.””

Lana is most looking forward to having a competitive year with strong players and good mentors during her upcoming rookie season with the Wolves.

Head Coach Chantelle LaMotte is looking forward to having Outside Hitter, Lana out on the court in the upcoming season.

“Lana is a dynamic attacker and an all around skilled passer, defender and server. We are excited to have her on-board. She has a very strong passion and relentless work ethic for the game of volleyball.”

Welcome to the pack, Lana.

GPRC Wolves Women’s Volleyball new recruit, Heather Holtz. Heather is committing to the Wolves for the 2019-20 season.

Joining the squad as a hometown rookie, Grande Prairie Composite High School graduate Heather Holtz is excited to be a part of the exciting future of GPRC and the Wolves Volleyball program.

Heather is bringing some awesome experience to the Wolves including bringing home silver in 2018 when her team, the South Peace Volleyball Club (SPVC) Blizzards were named #2 in Division 2 in Canada. Placing again in 2019, Heather along with her SPVC teammates bought home bronze at the Alberta Premier 2 and were named third in the province.

Heather is looking forward to starting her post-secondary journey at GPRC while being able to play with new and experienced players. “I am excited to be on an ACAC level team and playing against other Colleges and Universities at a high level and intensity than I’ve ever played at before.”

Heather chose GPRC because “it’s close to home, so I can be with my family and since I am unsure of what future career path I want to take, I can take courses through the Open Studies program and see what interests me while playing volleyball.”

Head Coach Chantelle LaMotte is thrilled to be adding a talented local athlete to the Wolves roster.

“Heather is an accomplished local athlete from the South Peace Volleyball Club who brings speed and a strong jumping ability to the court. She will be an asset as both an attacker and blocker in the middle position for the Wolves. We are very excited for Heather to join the pack.”

Welcome to the pack, Heather.

Learn more about your GPRC Wolves here and how you can continue to help support their athletic and academic goals.

GPRC Nursing Students on amazing journey in Ghana

Some of our Nursing students are having an amazing experience in Ghana in their final year of our collaborative degree program with the University of Alberta.

Christy Wuthrich, Jocelyn Wright and Nicole O’Flaherty are part of a group students who, along with instructor Corinne Rogers, who are sharing their experiences with photos and words with their fellow students.

Ghana Experience

We began this journey thinking about sacred stories that celebrate a sense of self, and the world which Crites (1971) explains are narrative in form. These sacred stories, Crites (1971)  states, lie too deep in the consciousness to be directly told, but are lived out as experience known as mundane stories. It is here that we began to acknowledge how our own mundane stories that guide us to make sense also clarify our own sense of the conscious world (Crites, 2007).  It is in here  that the stories we live by extend to mis-readings of the lives of others leading to moral thoughtlessness but when we allow the stories of others to work on us or get under our skin we are awakened to a moral call.  Thus, started our journey alongside mundane stories.

Crites, S. (1971). The narrative quality of experience. Journal of the American Academy   of         Religion, (39)3 291-311. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1461066

– Corinne Rogers

 

This picture is from the morning of our first clinical day while we hiked to a neighbouring village to do immunizations. My nerves were high as we set out, since I didn’t know what to expect in a culture and community so different from my own back in Canada. Yet on we went that morning, hiking into the unknown and out of our comfort zones.

That’s what it has felt like for our time here this far. Each day we are taking steps physically and emotionally towards being pushed to experience and learn. This growth isn’t always a comfortable feeling, as it makes me question myself as well as challenges me to look at the world through a new set of lenses. However, the local people here are so welcoming and kind, that they are making this transition an easier one. Plus, I couldn’t ask for a better team of Canadian nurses to share this experience with.

So even though at this moment I feel personally shaken, challenged  and unsure of so much, I’m excited to continue on this journey and the “hike” we are on, not only to learn about who I am as an individual but also who I am as a global citizen.

– Christy Wuthrich

 

Where to begin. I chose an image of me walking down a path to symbolize the new way of living I have discovered in Ghana.

When they say you’re traveling to find yourself, you don’t really know what they’re talking about until you experience it for yourself. We are a third of the way through our visit here and I feel I have experienced more uncomfortable, boundary-breaking things than I even knew I had.

I’ve been pushed mentally to accept the new and unknown, into the uncomfortable areas where you feel lost and need guidance. But despite all that, I am on the right path to discovering who I am at heart, the nurse I was called to be, and the human being that can look beyond their own borders and truly become a global citizen.

– Elizabeth Parry

 

The picture I have chosen is both a literal and metaphorical analogy for my experience so far. The culture in Ghana is fully immersed in, it is everywhere, from their traditional clothing to the red dirt, and even to the colour of their skin. As a Caucasian female, I notice my own colour in contrast to those around me, and how this makes me feel as a minority in this country, different.

I notice the admiration I have sometimes been given for the fairness of my skin and the blue of my eyes. An admiration I have done nothing to deserve. Young Ghanaian woman have told me “you are so beautiful; your skin is so beautiful.” I am quick to point out that their skin is beautiful to me, that brown eyes are my favourite eye colour, and that I love their hair.

I have never been so acutely aware of colour in my life, it is all around me and surrounds me.

-Laryssa Ubels

 

Ghana has been incomparable to anything I’ve experienced. Arriving to Ghana was full of excitement with diving into the unknown.

Trying new foods such as sugar cane, cocoa seed and plantain all entailed part of experiencing a new way of living. However, the unknown has also brought new emotions never felt before. Self-discovery, colonialism and privilege have all been brought to light by this uncharted territory.

I have decided to explore these emotions hand in hand with the impact they hold on my nursing practice. I continually explore the question of how these feelings can be understood within myself and with patients whom might be placed in similar vulnerable positions.

Preceptoring in Ghana has fostered a safe environment for emotional growth alongside eleven amazing peers, one mentor and the unparalleled Ghanaian people. A few short weeks has only allowed me to scratch the surface on the wonders of the unknown and what is to come.

– Danika Forester

 

Before arriving in Ghana, we were told a story about two individuals who formed a connection with one another despite not speaking the same language. I never truly understood how that was possible until I met the incredible children of Apemanim.

One afternoon we sat outside and played various card games with each other. Only two out of the group of children understood more than a few English words and I could only say a few sentences in Twi, yet for hours we sat together and socialized. We took the time to share our stories using hand gestures and charades, communicating with one another even though we didn’t even speak the same language. We exchanged expressions of confusion at first, followed by acceptance and joy.

My experience in Ghana thus far has taught me to appreciate the connection two individuals can have between each other. Even though we may not speak the same language, come from the same cultural backgrounds, or share the same beliefs, we’re all human.

– Emma

 

This experience thus far has taught me many things, including a unique and interesting culture as well as qualities I never knew about myself. It has pushed me to step out of my comfort zone and embrace feeling a little out of place.

For example, getting up to dance to Palm Wine music in front of a crowd, jumping on a tro-tro to catch a boat ride up Volta river or weighing babies on a scale hanging from a tree. The picture above is a highlight so far being in Ghana. It is a classroom we visited in Apemanim village full of brilliant and eager students. The visuals and tools around the classroom gave me an idea of what their activities were like and what a day at school looked like for the kids.

Almost a month has gone by, and it has felt like it has whipped right past. I am amazed at how much I have learned so far but even more amazed at how much more I need to learn.

– Shea Johnson

A picture that encapsulates my journey in Ghana thus far is this one. A picture that tells a story of curiosity, wonder, and acceptance. This picture was taken at the village of Apemanim and I chose this picture because it shows the curiosity that I have had and continue to have through this whole experience.

It shows the wonder of this world that I am in awe of, every day. It shows the acceptance that has been shown to us during our time here. Although we are only one third of the way through this experience, I have learned so much about myself, this beautiful culture and the people surrounding it.

I have cried, laughed, bonded, been pushed out of my comfort zone and created wonderful memories with the 12 other women on this journey. I have learned things about myself that I never knew were possible and I will be forever grateful for that. I will continue to be curious, wonder, and accept what the next portion of this crazy adventure has in store for me.

– Jessica Llewellyn

 

 

My home within a home just like the home I used to know

I think I found a home just like the one I used to know,

The kind that made my skin glow,

Although it’s not quite like the one I used to know,

I think I found a home just like the one I used to know.

 

I think I found a home just like the one I used to know,

The kind where every pebble is used to dribble,

Although it’s not quite like the one I used to know,

I think I found a home just like the one I used to know.

 

I think I found a home just like the one I used to know,

The kind where a “hiss” can be a kiss or a fist,

Although it’s not quite like the one I used to know,

I think I found a home just like the one I used to know.

 

I think I found a home,

The kind I have always known,

Although it’s not quite like the one I used to know,

I think I found a home just like the one I used to know.

 

I think I found another home,

Another home in between the Maple Leaf and the rivers at Lokoja.

I think I found a home,

Although it’s not the one I used to know.

– Chioma Obuekwe

 

Coming to Ghana I had an idea in my head of what this trip was going to be like. As with every expectation, I was not correct. I have no idea what the rest of the trip is going to have in store for me but as of right now, I feel this trip was as if I am in a big ball at the top of a hill.

The first month of classes was the building of that ball, the new perspective of the world around me, now that those classes are done, the ball it built with me in it, I am rolling full spread down the hill, getting just a glimpse of the lived experience of Ghanaians. These moments pass by in the blink of an eye but I would never change one thing about this experience because this time is shaping who I am going to be the rest of my life.

Never in my life have I ever been so conscious of the colour of my skin and the effect that being from Canada would have. These are moments, no matter how brief, where people are just people. Not locals, not obouroni. Just people.

These moments are where the most valuable learning experiences have come. This hill that I am rolling down is not smooth and my stomach has been in knots since everything has started but I work through to untangle these knots into meaningful experiences. These uncomfortable way people look at foreign skin. The way Canadians are seen to have the answers to problems and the money to solve them. The way my skin alone gives the perception that I am privileged and maybe I am privileged but how can just skin tell such a story.

These feelings will continue to knot up my stomach, however, the good in these feelings is near in the future, somewhere here in Ghana.

-Nicole O’Flaherty

 

The past month in Ghana has been an amazing journey. I’ve learned how to be resilient while stepping out of my comfort zone. I’ve met so many amazing people who’ve invited me into their culture, through food, dance, and stories. This is a picture of a little girl who greets us with hugs at the market outside of the hostel. Although we don’t speak the same language, we communicate through touch and laughter. I’m so grateful and privileged to be finishing my final semester of nursing in Ghana and can’t wait for next couple of months.

– Jocelyn Wright

The paths in this photo represent a journey; they do not necessarily represent my African experience specifically, but they represent an adventure.  I had an idea what some of the experiences would be like, but there were also so many surprises these past few weeks.

For example, I had no idea Ghana, or Africa for that matter, would have ‘normal’ malls with MAC and Pandora stores inside them. I figured that most of Africa would look like this photo.

Ghana further amazed me with its many small towns or villages that are bustling with small businesses at the roadside. It additionally has some stunning architectural building styles I have never seen before, of which are painted with bright colours and are quite unconventional in shape.

These revelations may seem small and unremarkable, but they truly stunned me; my expectations of this foreign place were profoundly and delightedly exceeded. I have come to realize that a low/moderate-income country like Ghana is not as desolate as I had imagined.

Therefore, this picture represents more than just a sunset with a view of paths through a field. This picture represents part of my journey, in which I have already learned to consider the flip side of my assumptions and to keep in mind that everyone’s perspective is both unique and undetermined. This picture represents the paths I have taken in life to discover my beliefs and values. This picture represents the paths I will take to discover who I am and where I want to be. This picture represents what my sense of adventure says about me.

– Samantha Gourley

One month has passed and it feels like we have been here for years and also like we only just got here. After living here for a month, something that never fails to amaze me is the openness and genuineness of the people who I encounter everyday. No matter where we are, whether it be on campus, the market or the village Apemanim we are greeted with a “hello” even if we are merely walking by one another.

I think about back at home, if I were to ask “how are you?” to every person that I was to walk by, why is it considered strange? Here in Ghana I’ve learned to not be afraid to open up and strike up a conversation with a stranger who I’ve just met and it’s one of the best lesson I’ve ever learned.

The sacred stories and advice that have been shared with me are what will make this adventure so memorable. In this photo is Nana, a 125- year-old woman who we were so lucky to have met in Apemanim. Looking into her eyes we could tell she had so much wisdom and life experiences to share.

She told us to stay humble, do not discriminate and always love one another and even though we did not speak the same language, her words reached my soul and I will carry her words with me for the rest of my life. I am so grateful to have met people like Nana in the one month of being here.

I’ll continue to strike up conversations with strangers not only while being here, but also at home in Canada because you’ll never know where that conversation will lead you.

– Veronica Perea

 

There’s still time for current nursing students to have this experience next year. Contact the Global Nursing Office at the University of Alberta at 780-492-5667 by Feb 22.

GPRC PEAK Kin Games 2018

GPRC PEAK Kin Games 2018

Have you heard the buzz or seen the posters around campus promoting the upcoming GPRC KIN Games?

Wondering what it’s all about? Let the PE1050 class answer all your questions.

The #GPRCKinGames18  is an opportunity for all GPRC students to get together and have a friendly, fun competition that will promote a positive experience being active and learning about the supports and services at the College to assist you on your healthy living journey, connecting with peers and their campus, and most importantly, students will build fun memories that will last a lifetime.

The games will take place over a four-day period, November 5 to 8 and students will compete in teams of 8-10 with their peers and friends throughout the week for points.

The first two days will consist of team competitions in dodgeball, spikeball, floor hockey and wolf-pong. The third day will be a fun dance competition followed by a closing ceremony on the fourth and final day. There is something for everyone.

The experience will represent a taste of the culture, and vibrancy that is found in the PEAK and Campus Recreation departments at the College.

We encourage all students from all departments, sport teams and friend groups to get involved and help your team win great prizes for Best Dressed, Best Dance and the Spirit Award.

Let’s not forget the Championship team will win full bragging rights as they show off their champion shirts, amazing prizes and have their name etched on the ‘Golden Shoe’ Trophy at the closing ceremony.

So, what are you waiting for? Get involved and spend the beginning of November being a part of the first ever #GPRCKinGames18!

Register at the Fitness Centre, or send in your Team Registration information form to jthibault@gprc.ab.ca
Registration Fee: $5 per person
Registration Deadline: Friday, November 2 @ 12 p.m.